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Did you know? Some lesser-known facts about Britain’s top attractions

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You’ve probably heard of all these places, but there are a few fun facts you probably didn’t know we think you might like…

Windsor Castle

Windsor Castle by Buddhacat1 on Flickr
Photo by Buddhacat1 on Flickr

We’re lucky to have Windsor Castle. Not only did it survive two sieges, but in 1649 it survived a bill for its demolition too – by just one vote!

Tower of London

Tower of London by xiquinhosilva on Flickr
Photo by xiquinhosilva on Flickr

Despite being built to withstand serious onslaught by enemy troops and siege machinery, the only time the Tower of London was ever breached was actually by a riotous band of peasants during the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381.

Clifton Suspension Bridge

Clifton Suspension Bridge by yoJoebosolo on Flickr
Photo by yoJoebosolo on Flickr

One of Bristol’s most beautiful spots would have been the scene of a tragedy if it wasn’t for Victorian ladies’ fashion. In 1886, Sarah Ann Henley threw herself from the bridge after an argument with a lover, but her billowing crinoline petticoats helped to slow her fall and cushioned her landing. She landed in the mud, and though injured, she survived and lived until 1948.

Stirling Castle

Stirling Castle

Stirling Castle was the scene of Scotland’s first recorded attempt at flight. It was way back in 1507, and the hopeful aviator was Italian alchemist John Damian. Unfortunately, the feathered wings Damian had built for the purpose proved ineffective: he crashed ignominiously into a dunghill and broke his leg.

The Lake District National Park

Scafell Pike by asands on Flickr
Photo by asands on Flickr

The Lake District is a place of many superlatives. It’s the largest National Park in England, taking up about 1% of Britain’s landmass. It’s also home to England’s highest mountain (Scafell Pike), its deepest lake (Wastewater) and its wettest inhabited place (Seathwaite).

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